Tell me all your thoughts on God

I’ll be honest. I’m not really sure what I believe about God most days. I grew up in a charismatic church, married a Lutheran, and then attended Baptist and Calvinist churches until we decided to leave. We’ve tried a few other churches, but our beliefs have morphed and changed. Since we experienced a lot of spiritual abuse at the hands of the leaders of our last church, it’s been hard to go back. And at this point, we are pretty much done with the church.

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Over the past few months,  I will say, I’ve thought a lot about my relationship, or lack thereof, with God. I still feel as if I have one. I often will pray prayers in my head and I think about verses I’ve learned and I still try to be kind, loving, and forgiving even if I don’t know where I stand some days with my faith. I still desire to know the truth about God. I find him even more mysterious than I ever have, but I haven’t written him off as uncaring, unloving, or not hearing me. I just feel as if this journey requires me to dig my heels in and decide. It calls out to me and asks, “What is it that you really believe about me?” And that question is something I keep asking myself and fine-tuning as I go.

I am a very observant person. Growing up rather sheltered and withdrawn, I learned early on to watch not what people say, but what they don’t say. And to keep an eye on what they do. People tend to say all kinds of nice sounding things, but it’s what they do and what they don’t say that interest me.

When I tell people I don’t go to church, they automatically assume I’m going to hell. They can’t believe I’ve walked away from God. When I try to explain myself, I am faced with a lot of odd looks and strange body language as if I birthed an alien.

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The look I get when I tell people I don’t go to church. Photo by Moose Photos on Pexels.com

I’ve noticed over the years something about Christians, especially those who religiously attend church and swear by the tradition. They say a lot of nice sounding things, but if you end up not agreeing or have doubts, they quickly turn into people that become hurtful and angry.

I’ve thought a lot about this over the past week. A friend of mine decided to attend church and then wrote an email to the pastor about some things he found that went against the scripture. The pastors reply was more or less “I don’t like what you said, so don’t come back to my church. Signed, Pastor, PHD”. Interestingly, I was out on the lake looking at God’s beauty in creation while thousands of people were sitting in pews “going to church”. I told my friend, “This is what church really is: Admiring God’s creation instead of playing dress-up and trying to impress people”.  It’s true I feel more connected to God in nature than I do sitting around his so-called people.

But after I read the Pastor’s response to my friend, the thought occurred to me that the church itself–I mean, buildings of people gathering to watch a Pastor perform every Sunday–is in and of itself Satanic. And maybe I don’t trust that word anymore either since I don’t always buy into the entire idea of Satan, but the church could be defined as something evil. It’s idolatry, really.

Got Questions defines idolatry this way:

The definition of idolatry, according to Webster, is “the worship of idols or excessive devotion to, or reverence for some person or thing.” An idol is anything that replaces the one, true God.

Exodus 20 states, “You shall have no other gods before me. You shall not make for yourself an idol in the form of anything in heaven above or on the earth beneath or in the waters below. You shall not bow down to them or worship them; for I, the LORD your God, am a jealous God, punishing the children for the sin of the fathers to the third and fourth generation of those who hate me.”

Yet, what is a Pastor these days? Nothing more than an idol. And when you try to point out how corrupt and evil this is, you will see the way you are treated. It’s pure evil. Most Christians I know treat their pastor as they would Jesus Christ. They see him as the messenger between God and themselves. They see him as a person who is granted some sort of special powers and has the ability to be called. This is hogwash. And it’s idolatry.

In my last church, people asked the pastor if they should get this or that car, how to parent their kid, if they should go on a special diet, if they thought certain diseases were real, how to spend their money, mental health issues, marriage problems, abuse problems, and on and on. They wouldn’t look outside the church for help because to do so was frowned upon. The Pastor was seen as the guy with the answers.

frida-bredesen-317281-unsplashTo go against the pastor is to go against Jesus himself. And to go against the pastor is to be treated as the enemy of the church. I recently read a comment about people who write posts such as this one and they said that anything that is divisive is of the devil. If that’s the case, then so is Martin Luther, Galileo, or in modern day, Rachel Denhollander.

Are Christians really demons? Are they really filled with Christ or with the power of Satan? It’s as if they can’t search the Bible, if that’s what they claim to believe, and realize that most of what they say and do is not even in the Bible! The term “Pastor” is only used once and the term “shepherd” is not defined by ruling over a group of people and having their unquestionable loyalty. I appreciated this video by Servus Christi:

Most churches are run by marketing and business efforts. Pastors go to seminary to be a tool of change in the hands of God, but money corrupts the best of us. And so does power. I don’t believe that Jesus really wanted his church to be defined by the love of money (which is the root of all kinds of evil) or by commending ourselves with titles and status. If you read scripture, you will notice how Christ sees those who are outside of prestige and popularity as the ones who will inherit the kingdom, not the proud and boastful who flaunt their professions and call themselves “Pastor, PHD”.

Of course, I’m being a little cheeky when I say that they are demons. I know most Christians are not. But I wonder about their reactions. It’s this put-up-your-dukes-and-lets-fight attitude. It’s accusations and name calling and assumptions about salvation and hell. To argue against a pastor or a church’s ideology is to be shunned and treated as Satan himself. It makes me wonder if these people are truly of Christ, or of the devil himself. Because to love Christ is to be patient, kind, and respectful. What I see is a bunch of rude, prideful people who claim they are defending the faith but really are defending their choices. To question those choices is to place doubt into their minds about the very thing they believe and put their hope in–their church and pastors. It has replaced their need for Christ, although they falsely assume they are still loving and serving Him by going to church and defending their beliefs to the death.

Of course, most Christians won’t want to hear a thing I have to say. Steven Hassan, an expert on mind control, uses the term BITE to describe how people can be sucked into cults (including pastor worship and church worship). Cults seek to manipulate our Behaviour, the Information we access, our Thoughts and Emotions. You can see a bigger version of these images here.

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Most times, it’s not this obvious or in your face. Sometimes it’s subtle and elusive, but when you step back, you can see exactly what it was. Some churches are cults by definition. Some are toxic. Some are “cultish” and exhibit some of these behaviors, but not all. In any case, why would anyone want to be associated with such things? Even if you only exhibit one thing in this entire list, it’s too much.

It’s why I can honestly say the church is evil. And I won’t be running back to the same place I escaped from. While my relationship with God still hangs in the balance, the church won’t be the place where I find him again. The church did so much damage to my thinking, my emotions, my sense of self that I can not imagine what my life would be like if I had stayed and kept enduring their lies and control.

It might look ugly right now where I’m at, but it’s my ugly. I’m free to think, be, and make my own choices which aren’t influenced by some dude with a suit and a narcissistic personality disorder. I’m not sure why Christians call themselves “free” or claim they have “freedom in Christ” when they are so wrapped up into their churches and what their leaders or pastors have deemed important. So many Christians lives consist of serving in the church, giving all their extra income to the church, and attending church. They can’t imagine life outside the walls of their church!

There is life and joy outside the walls, the people, and the events in a church building. I’m learning to enjoy the real world and each person I encounter. There is no line of who I can talk to or not talk to, where I can go and can’t go, or what opportunities I can join or not join. My calendar is not booked up with church events and my mind if not bogged down with guilt, shame, and sorrow from being manipulated by the teachings of the church.

If the Bible is lovely and pure and holy, I sure never found it in the church.

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12 thoughts on “Tell me all your thoughts on God

  1. Melissa B. says:

    I absolutely understand your struggle. Im not a big churchgoer myself and I’ve definitely struggled with my faith. I’ve found so many churches teach their opinion instead of God’s word. As of lately, I’ve been focusing on private Bible studies and praying that I’ll be given wisdom and understanding, that my relationship with God will thrive again. The church is not the building people gather in, but the community striving to live a God-fearing and meaningful life!
    -MB
    hearteningessentials.wordpress.com

    Liked by 1 person

    • Michelle says:

      Hi Melissa! thanks for stopping by and leaving a comment. I’m struggling right now to open my bible. I think it is a kind of PTSD in a sense. It’s hard for me to open up my bible and read when so much of the scriptures has been used against me like a weapon. And then I find myself being angry about it.

      I agree that the church isn’t a building. It’s sad really that people put themselves inside of boxes when there is a giant world that is out there. Maybe we won’t even scratch the surface or travel the world, but I feel like many people limit themselves to being in a church building when you can look around and see opportunities to love and be kind almost anywhere.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Ben says:

    I think by now you probably have a decent idea of where I am when it comes to God. I don’t feel God. I don’t hear God. I don’t see any direct, tangible evidence for God. However, I am open to the idea of God. I am never going to say I don’t believe in God. The furthest I can go is saying ” I don’t know for sure.” What I do know is that I do not trust the Bible any longer. The tainted history that has man’s fingerprints all over it is enough for me to say that an all-powerful, all-knowing god could do better than a manmade book full of contradictions and poor science. A book without evidence outside of it’s pages. A book used for control, not growth. A book that we still struggle to agree on is not something I think God would have used for us to follow. When we are unsure of its authenticity, God doesn’t step in to convince us, but rather man does and we all know how trustworthy people can be.

    If God is there and God is interested in getting me to follow him and worship him, then God alone would know what it would take to convince me. People teach what they’ve been taught when it comes to God. Unfortunately much of what is taught is wrong. When wrong teaching is passed on and passed on and passed on, it just gets worse and the cycle never ends.

    Again, I am more than open to the idea of God and more than open to accept if some sort of evidence can be provided. Ancient hearsay in a book written by unknown authors just doesn’t do it for me anymore. I too find much more beauty and what I would say is much more believable evidence of a creator in nature. Churches are man’s thing and some people like being told what to do and when to do it. Not me. I like to think for myself and be my own judge of what is real and what is not.

    Great post and good questions to get people thinking.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Michelle says:

      It is pretty sad that people like to be told what to do. I sure don’t! And good points about men adding to the Bible. It’s true. Churches are nothing more than Businesses that need a way to make more money. So they attract yes men and women who don’t question the rules. It’s a pretty good marketing plan actually all under the cover of love and care and being the church. Lol. What a joke.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. ACountryBoy says:

    I grew up in a religion. Didn’t take long to know it is false. However, I have a wonderful relationship with Jesus. He’s my Savior. God has made Himself known through everything He has created. The sky, stars, mountains, flowers, trees, right down to the smallest critter are evidence we have a Creator. Humans, as the Bible says, are fearfully and wonderfully made. Nothing is an accident.

    Having said all that, do I like going to church? No, not really. Why” Because a lot of folks who go are no different from the world. They do not know Jesus as their Lord and Savior. They are there to do “good works.” That’s religion. I could go on and on, but that would be a post and not a comment.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Michelle says:

      No worries about long comments. Lol. And yeah, I found that too while in church. But to say so, I was seen as a divisive or negative person. I am exploring on my own without church which is lonely sometimes but it’s better.

      Like

  4. ACountryBoy says:

    Religious people hate it when someone rocks the boat.

    I like the way Jesus had “church.” He taught His disciples outside. They got to ask all the questions they wanted. No rules. No rituals. No Religion.

    Liked by 1 person

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